Ben Langhinrichs

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February, 2004
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Genii Weblog


Civility in critiquing the ideas of others is no vice. Rudeness in defending your own ideas is no virtue.


Thu 19 Feb 2004, 11:08 PM
Nothing unusual about the fact that it is taking unusually long to finish the latest (and probably last) @Midas Formulas beta.  Development  always takes longer than I expect.  In any case, I decided to put up a demo so that those long suffering beta testers (and the rest of you) can have something solid to look at rather than just listen to me blab on about it.

As I have mentioned before, developing with @Midas feels quite different than developing with the Midas Rich Text LSX.  In fact, the on-line demo I have added is the one hinted at back in November in my post @Midas demos feel quite different.  @Midas A La Carte is an odd little demo in which you create your own menu and @Midas has two jobs.  The first is to generate HTML from the rows selected and put it together in a new table.  The second is to do lookups on the price tables to determine the price of each selected item, then accumulate those for a total price.  (The actual code is available from the Help Using document on the web, but it is packed together and a bit tough to read).

So, why does this feel odd?  Why is this different than a Midas Rich Text LSX demo?

Because there is not a single editable field in the demo.  There are not any rich text fields at all.  In fact, the entire demo works without any documents, since there are no documents in the database nor any created by the demo.  Also, no JavaScript, no LotusScript, no agents of any description.   All there are are some computed fields (which possibly could be computed for display, but I am never sure if that will work for CGI fields) and some computed text.  Is this useful?  Not in its current format, perhaps, but the idea of using @Midas to create dynamic HTML in this fashion is very useful.

So, try out the @Midas A La Carte demo.  Let me know what you think.  Is it clear what is happening?  Do you have any trouble in different browsers?  Would you like to join the beta and try creating this sort of application to explore its uses?  Let me know what you think, as I'm starved for feedback after such a long development cycle.

Copyright 2004 Genii Software Ltd.